Friday, May 18, 2007


CHECK OUT THESE GORGEOUS PINS!!!
A lovely lady named Natalie sent me the most wonderful gift this week. Thank you, Natalie! These two handmade pins, shaped with a puzzle (for autism) with three children, to represent my own sweet girls. The red one has Mom and Dad. The pink one is to wear when I'm pissed off at Mark and pretending he doesn't exist.... (Just kidding, hon!)
These pins are from a company called http://lucinda.com. You can order them in all shapes, sizes, colors for fundraisers or for your own use.
Here's their "EUREKA MOMENT."
"Knowing there was something she could do to help herself overcome poverty and homelessness, Lucinda Yates used her creativity and drive to launch a successful line of fashion jewelry. One day Lucinda designed a simple pin in the shape of a house. That was the moment Lucinda knew she could help others. The House Pin she created that day became the perfect fundraiser for a local shelter. It gave the shelter greater visibility. And financial support. It started a business dedicated to helping non-profits succeed."
How cool is that?? Please do check out her site and buy 50, 100, 1000 pins....

14 comments:

Holly Kennedy said...

What a wonderful idea!
I'm gonna slip over to her site and order some for my kids' teachers and their bus driver.
Thanks for the link, Kim

Trish Ryan said...

I have one of her house pins. Good stuff. That's so sweet that she sent these to you :)

mcewen said...

The only magnet I have on my car is the autism puzzle ribbon - so many people complain about that logo!
Cheers

Eileen said...

Thanks for sharing, I have never seen these. They are really nice pins, and I love pins. I will definately visit and pass the word. Peace, Cheryl

kim the blog owner said...

McEwen, it's so easy to offend someone just a bit every single day, don't you think? LOL! I won't put the blue puzzle piece magnet on my minivan - but I have the Think Autism. Think Cure. puzzle ribbon magnet proudly displayed. And that one bothers some people. But those people will put the Autism Awareness puzzle ribbon on their cars and on it goes! But you know what? At the end of the day, I think any one of us in the autism community would come to the aid of another parent in the blink of an eye. Philosophies not withstanding.

Amanda said...

I have two profoundly autistic kids who I wouldn't change for anyhting. Stop thinking cure and start thinking accept. Use your energies to spread awareness for acceptance and tolerance or is that too radical for the US?

kim the American blog owner said...

Amanda, thank you for the suggestion. It's too laid back for America, at least for this America. And that would be the easy route, for sure. We Americans, since you brought up nations, are activists, do'ers, problem solvers, dreamers, unwilling to say "that's the best we can do so let's quit", or having you forgotten that drubbing the Redcoats took back in 1776??

Do come back - I welcome all voices. I really do.

Yours,

Kim

Niksmom said...

I find it fascinating that we, as a nation, have becoe so much less tolerant of diverging viewpoints. I mean, hello, wasn't this country founded on those principles (ok, so that's a grpss distillation, but you get the point)?? Why does it have to be black OR white? Can't we accept and include and love our kids while at the same time search for a cause of cure that would help those who wish it? Or is THAT too radical for this country, this society? I ams sick of people telling me it has to be one OR the other.

Amanda said...

Laid back? Nope! Realistic and wanting the best for autistic people? Yes! Celebrating their achievements? Yes! By the way, it is widely accepted that Einstien was on the spectrum and so were many of the brilliant minds of history. How do you propose to "cure" my children? Thier brains and nervous structure are physiologically different. It is not only arrogant but offers false hope to desperate parents to bander the "cure" word around. I urge you to bend your way of thinking to strucure your world differently and reach over to the autistic world. You might just learn something.

Anonymous said...

PS If America is such a great place to be why do you feel the need to carry guns and why are they used in your schools? Not being nasty, just curious

kim the blog owner said...

Hmmm - I love being an American. Partially because I can speak out against the things in this country that I DO NOT love. That's a true freedom. We have problems, we create problems and we also solve problems. The world turns its eyes to us for help - and spits on us out of hate. I think the next election might bring enough change that we can regain our reputation around the world. As for guns? Many of us here are as perplexed as you are. Thanks curious but not nasty. As I said, I'm happy to chat. Off to drink my Starbucks - what are you having - tea? We dumped that stuff in the harbor YEARS ago! Or perhaps a Vegamite sandwich? ;)

kim the blog owner said...

Amanda, I forgot to mention this in response to your asking me to reach out to autistic people. We have a young adult with Asperger's who is currently under probation at his/her job in a store that I frequent. I had become friendly with him/her over the last several months - and I see him/her in Church most every week. We have disussed autism extensively. He/she is being fired for inappropriate conversations with customers. An Apsergian trait - speaking without necessarily being in synch with the person you're speaking to, yes? I had a LONG conversation with the store manager about Asperger's and it's features - explaining he could not fire him/her for her a trait that was part of a known diagnosis - I used the term "disability" so he would understand me. I will continue to go to bat for this person with autism. I think he/she would have a lawsuit if fired for Aspergian traits, don't you? AND, I just managed a phone consult with a distraught Grandma half way across the country whose Aspie grandson flunked out of Junior College for lack of support and is now teetering in depression. I hooked her up with Stephen Shore and many other folks who can help the family. I advocate for ALL segments of the autism world, except for those who tell me that my work for my OWN CHILDREN is harmful, useless, invalid or worse, based in dislike. I think even KL is starting to understand me a little better. None of us are cartoon characters, to be summed up in a word or two, unless we present ourselves as such. I don't think I do that. Although I do speak loudly out of the courage of my convictions.

Yours,

KIM

Amanda said...

I think you've missed my point or got it the wrong way - US culture is very different to that of UK and that I assume produces a different way of thinking. I strongly support research into the CAUSES of autism, but as for the cure, forget it , we don't yet know what we're up against. We canhelp manage the symptoms and be tolerant - by the way, a good analogy for your store manager is that he would not expect a person in a wheelchair to deal with stairs, so why would he expect the asperger to get social content?

As it goes I do drink tea but us Brits eat Marmite not veggiemite, that's AUstralia!

kim the blog owner said...

Amanda, that's EXACTLY the analogy I used with the manager - you couldn't fire an employee who was in a wheelchair for NOT being able to reach the top shelf. Sigh... I fear for this young woman. I really do. What if she becomes terribly depressed if she loses her job? Cure is just a word. Like with cancer - you say you're "Cured" but aren't you always on the watch for the return? Are you ever truly cured. It's a nice word though in that it implies "finished with the nasty parts." How about we coin "Quured" to imply cured but still quirky? Can you live with that?? :)

Let's not split hairs over terms and instead let's just fight for our darn kids however we're best suited.

Loved having the Queen here a few weeks ago. She's so damn elegant and er, well, British!